Assam tea

Assam tea
Assam tea

Assam tea (阿萨姆红茶)is the world-famous black tea, and Darjeeling tea, Ceylon black tea, Chinese Keemun black tea, known as the world’s four major black tea, love by consumer. Quality characteristics of Assam tea:
Shape: flat and straight
Color: dark brown
Soup color: reddish auburn
Aroma: malt and rose smell
Taste: heavy and thick, fresh and mellow
Infused leaves: red bright and soft

Assam is a black tea named after the region of its production, Assam, in India. Assam tea, most of which is grown at or near sea level, is known for its body, briskness, malty flavor, and strong, bright color. Assam teas, or blends containing Assam, are often sold as “breakfast” teas. English breakfast tea, Irish Breakfast tea, and Scottish Breakfast Tea are common generic names.
The tea plant is grown in the lowlands of Assam, unlike Darjeelings and Nilgiris, which are grown in the highlands. The Assam tea bush grows in a lowland region, in the valley of the Brahmaputra River, an area of clay soil rich in nutrients of the floodplain. The climate varies between a cool, arid winter and a hot, humid rainy season—conditions ideal for it. Because of its lengthy growing season and generous rainfall, Assam is one of the most prolific tea-producing regions in the world.
Assam tea is generally harvested twice, in a “first flush” and a “second flush.” The first flush is picked during late March. The second flush, harvested later, is the more prized “tippy tea,” named thus for the gold tips that appear on the leaves. This second flush, tippy tea, is sweeter and more full-bodied and is generally considered superior to the first flush tea. The leaves of the Assam tea bush are dark green and glossy and fairly wide compared to those of the Chinese tea plant. The bush produces delicate white blossoms.
Though Assam generally denotes the distinctive black teas from Assam, the region produces smaller quantities of green and white teas as well with their own distinctive characteristics. Historically, Assam has been the second commercial tea production region after southern China. Southern China and Assam are the only two regions in the world with native tea plants.